Censorship & Cultural Attitudes
A Profile of Those Who Support Censorship

We compared those who strongly agree that entertainment content should be more tightly regulated for violent and romantic content and that entertainment content should be banned if some people find it offensive against those who disagree or take a neutral position on these issues. 

When profiling those who “strongly support censorship”, a similar but not identical profile emerges compare to those with a strong sense of culture:

Demographically, those who strongly support censorship are older more likely to have a child in the household are less educated  and are more likely to be of Arab descent than those who are not supportive of censorship.

Behaviorally, those who strongly support censorship attend religious services more often than those who don’t support censorship (14% vs. 22% never go) and spend more time with family (43 hours vs. 33 hours weekly) and less time with friends (10 hours vs. 15 hours weekly). They are less likely to use the internet (65% vs. 80%), and those who are online are less likely to be on Facebook (80% vs. 91%) and Google+ (27% vs. 43%). They are less likely to share their opinions about entertainment online (50% vs. 39% do not share).

Attitudinally, those who strongly support censorship are more likely than those who don’t support it to want to preserve their culture (91% vs. 55%). They are more likely to enjoy films about their own culture (74% vs. 37%) and to feel there should be more about culture in entertainment (78% vs. 39%).

From an entertainment perspective, censorship supporters are more likely than those who do not support censorship or are neutral about it to consume and enjoy films, television and online content in Arabic and content from the MENA region, but are no less likely than others to consume and enjoy media in English and from outside the region. They are less likely to prefer action/adventure films (43% vs. 61%) and horror/thriller films (18% vs. 25%), and more likely to prefer dramas (48% vs. 33%), religious (18% vs. 8%) and historical films (12% vs. 8%). They are more likely to listen to Arabic music (89% vs. 60%) and less likely to listen to Western music (29% vs. 62%). Those who play video games are less likely to play games related to sports (28% vs. 40%) and war (22% vs. 30%) and more likely to play games in Arabic (31% vs. 19%) and those related to education (17% vs. 11%). They are more likely to prefer to watch news on television (43% vs. 37%) and they spend more time with news content online (48% vs. 41% of time spent accessing news videos).